Join the local evolution

Posted by Sustainable OKC | Posted in Change, Community, Events, Food and Drink, Locavore, Sustainable OKC, Transition OKC | Posted on 20-04-2011

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evolve no shadowSix Oklahoma City chefs, restaurants and caterers are creating tasty local food as part of Sustainable OKC’s EVOLVE juried art exhibition and fundraiser at Oklahoma City’s first juried Local Food Challenge this Saturday, April 23, 7 p.m. at Individual Artists of Oklahoma (IAO), 706 W. Sheridan on historic film row in downtown Oklahoma City.

The Local Food Challenge is organized by Transition OKC, a program of Sustainable OKC. The art exhibition will explore sustainability, resilience and community and proceeds from the event will benefit Sustainable OKC and IAO.

Food Challenge contestants will be judged by a panel of food industry professionals as they compete for a $500 juried prize. Guests enjoying the art exhibition will also have the opportunity to sample the local food creations and vote for the contestant they feel deserves the People’s Choice award via raffle tickets.

Follow the EVOLVE / Local Food Challenge on Facebook, buy $25 tickets (or individual sponsorships!) online at Sustainable OKC’s website here or at IAO, 706 W. Sheridan, or at the door the night of the event.

It’s all about local art – local food – local fun!

Art exhibition jurors (awarding a $500 grand prize to the winning piece)

  • Randy Marks, Groundwork
  • Stephen Kovash, Istvan Gallery

Local Food Challenge contestants

  • 105Degrees
  • Chef Kurt Fleischfresser
  • Chef Kamala Gamble
  • Prairie Gypsies
  • Chef Ryan Parrott
  • The Wedge Pizzeria

Local Food Challenge Jurors

  • Gail Vines, Flip’s Wine Bar & Trattoria
  • Chef Jonathon Stranger, Ludivine
  • Linda Trippe, The Lady Chef

+ YOU vote for the People’s Choice Award

$1 raffle ticket = 1 vote / vote as many times as you like

Music

thespyfm.com

Tickets

  • $25 @ the door or online @ www.sustainableokc.org 
  • or at IAO, 706 W. Sheridan, Oklahoma City
  • or at the door the night of the event
Technorati Tags: ,,,,,sustainable okc,transition okc

One local food meal = one step toward reducing foreign oil dependence

Posted by Sustainable OKC | Posted in Change, Community, Conservation, Consumption, Energy, Food and Drink, Local Economy, Locavore, Oklahoma City, Peak Oil, Resiliency, Shauna Lawyer Struby, Sustainability, Sustainable OKC, Transition OKC | Posted on 14-04-2011

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Slide14

A couple of weeks ago Transition OKC helped host a Local Food Meet and Greet. The Meet and Greet provided a host of folks passionate about growing a local food system the opportunity to network and get to know each other better. It was enthusiastically and well-attended, with more than 110 people coming on a sunny Saturday afternoon to IAO Gallery in Oklahoma City to nosh on locally produced food, wine and do a little “speed meeting.”

The event was organized by the “Going Locavore Group,” a loosely organized and growing grassroots coalition (or alliance) of several Oklahoma City organizations focused on catalyzing and transitioning our food system to a healthier, more sustainable and resilient one – and one strategy for doing so is to localize it. The team organizing the event was for the most part all-volunteer, and although we were scrambling up until the last minute to put all the details in place – we pulled it off – a total team effort if there ever was one. If you have any interest in networking with this group, or want more info, email us at localfoodokc@gmail.com

As one of the volunteers working on this event, part of my task was to put together a slide show about the reasons for transitioning to eating local food, and to provide a high-level overview of some of the initiatives in other states focused on growing regional and local food systems. As we researched, we discovered coalitions in New York City and Vermont have aggressive strategic plans for regional and localized food sheds and the body of work on this topic is growing exponentially — encouraging.

Above you’ll find one of the slides from the presentation and I’ll be sharing more of these in the coming days. Eventually will put the whole presentation online at ThinkLady and here on Fresh Greens as well Transition OKC’s website so if it is useful in any way to other local food efforts, it’s available for anyone to use and adapt.

In the meantime, given the high price of gas these days, the fact the era of cheap, easy-to-produce oil is over, and the growing production decline in one of the U.S.’s major suppliers of oil – Mexico — thought this slide might be a good one to start with. It illustrates one way we can begin to reduce our dependence on foreign oil imports. Ebullient and grateful hat tip to Barbara Kingsolver and Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life, for helping us imagine a different way of eating in the world.

Imagine abundant local food. Imagine the jobs it will create and the ways it will strengthen our local economy. Envision the health it will bring to our school kids, our communities, the resilience it will give our communities. Imagine how much we can reduce our country’s oil addiction if we eat not just one, but two local food meals a week, three, five, etc. Imagine. And then try it. I think you’ll like it.

If you’d like info on how to get started eating locally head over to Transition OKC’s website where we have a page full of local food resources.

– post by Shauna Struby, this post originally appeared on ThinkLady 

Transition sweeps down the Oklahoma plains

Posted by Sustainable OKC | Posted in Change, Christine Patton, Community, Education, Energy, Environment, Locavore, Oklahoma City, Shauna Lawyer Struby, Sustainability, Transition Movement | Posted on 30-07-2010

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logo with spaceTransition OKC, a project of Sustainable OKC, became the nation’s 27th official Transition initiative in May of 2009. The TOKC coordinating team took several months to lay the foundations of this project by discussing the “Transition Handbook,” hosting a Training for Transition, and setting principles, guidelines and a constitution in place (neatly stored in PVC-free binders, thanks to Shauna Struby). Once the team worked the consensus process and crafted a mission, vision, and goals, a tornado of creativity and energy was unleashed here on the Great Plains. Here’s the scoop! 

Going Locavore
Local food champions are very active here in Oklahoma City, but we don’t often have a chance to get together to discuss strategies, share updates and success stories, and plot ways to expand the local food market. Enter Transition OKC, which is now sponsoring Going Locavore happy hour potlucks so all these fabulous people can get together in the same room and share ideas. After one meeting and some intense brainstorming, the next meeting is slated to focus in on the most promising of the hundreds of ideas and start serving up some local food projects. Several members of the coordinating group are working on this project, but Christine Patton of the TOKC coordinating team has taken on the responsibility of pulling the meetings together for now. photo8

Sustainability Center
The indomitable Susie Shields, another TOKC coordinating team member, was so inspired by the "Hands" portion of Rob Hopkins’ “Transition Handbook,” she vowed to create a Sustainability Demonstration Community Center. She put together a diverse team of architects, sustainability pros, nonprofit, business and government folks to forge a way forward with this dream. Education and programming and site selection subcommittees are already hard at work brainstorming and researching.

Reskilling Videos
TOKC’s coordination team believes reskilling workshops (learning how to do things for ourselves again) are a fantastic way to help people transition. It’s learning valuable skills, education, sharing information on the challenges we face, networking, food and/or beer and wine – all rolled into one. Put all that learning on video and wow – that’s one way to spread reskilling beyond the 10 or 20 people that can make it to a workshop. Luckily Trey Parsons of Enersolve and Christine Patton, TOKC coordinating team members, are ready to take on the challenge of creating a set of short reskilling videos to share information about how to cook with local food, install a rainwater catchment system, weatherize a house, use a sun oven, grow a garden, make pesto and peach jam and sun-dried tomatoes, and more. Lots of excitement about this as it will give these two the chance to run around all over the metro area asking questions of interesting people and maybe learning a few things too.

Movie Night
Several TOKC team members – Vicki Rose, Marcy Roberts, and Susie Shields – are planning quarterly movies night at Oklahoma City University. Since movies raise awareness about environmental problems, economic crisis, our precarious energy situation, and climate change, they’re a great way to start a conversation and brainstorm on how to address the issues.

Permaculture Design Course
Randy Marks of Land+Form and Shauna Struby are in the early stages of working with Permaculture teachers to design a course for Oklahoma. Short courses on Permaculture design (Permaculture is a design system for creating sustainable human settlements) have photo1been held here in Oklahoma, but if people want the full course, they have to go out of state which makes the cost prohibitive for so many. By bringing a full-scale design course here, Randy and Shauna anticipate greater participation and lots more Transitioning. Interestingly enough, Oklahoma’s 45th Infantry just had a team train in Permaculture design before they headed to Afghanistan, and this helps folks here in Oklahoma make a connection to the potential of Permaculture design for our communities.

Wired and Connected
TOKC’s Going Local OKC website has been enhanced with new navigation, a new look and a lot of new content. Shauna, Trey and Christine redesigned it to be more user-friendly, timely and flexible. Plus, it needed to expand to be able to contain all the new info TOKC will be posting on various projects (see above), as well as the handy OKC Resource pages (six at last count). TOKC also ties continuously updated media, such as this collaborative Fresh Greens blog, Sustainable OKC Twitter feed, and the TOKC Facebook page, into the website. A big thank you to Transition OKC and Sustainable OKC volunteers for keeping the content fresh and updated.

Teaching and Listening 
One of the things TOKC often hears when out and about in Oklahoma City is there is a great need for more education and awareness about the challenges we face and possible solutions within the general population. TOKC has given many presentations and conducted workshops over the last few months and plans to not only continue with this work,but the project has made it a goal to increase the number of presentations as they go forward. Shauna, Marcy, Vicki, Adam and Christine are working together to make this happen. If you’d like to have TOKC make a presentation to your neighborhood, civic, church group or school, please email them at info@goinglocalokc.com.

But Wait, There’s More
Susie just created a Buy Fresh Buy Local Farmer’s Market guide and she and Marcy are working on a comprehensive eight-page "Big Book" guide to local food. Plus Transition OKC is planning to redesign printed materials such as brochures and offer a fall and winter gardening workshop.  photo2

So there you go. The whole TOKC coordinating team – Randy, Shauna, Christine, Vicki, Marcy, Susie, Trey, Adam, Jim, Chase and Joseph – have all been working hard. Whether you’re in Oklahoma City or elsewhere, you’re invited to join in the workshops, presentations, friend them on Facebook, follow them on Twitter! They’ll be sharing what they’re doing here, reading all about what everyone else is up to, and sharing that too as they keep on sweeping down the plains.

– Inspired by a post written by Christine Patton, TOKC team member, on her blog at Peak Oil Hausfrau; tweaked and reposted with Christine’s permission on “Fresh Greens” by Shauna Lawyer Struby, TOKC team member

Native Views On Sustainable Food

Posted by Sustainable OKC | Posted in Community, Farming, Food and Drink, Indigenous culture, Shauna Lawyer Struby, Sustainability | Posted on 11-05-2010

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Paul Hawken, notable environmentalist, entrepreneur, journalist and author
once wrote:

“A Native American taught me that the division between ecology and human
rights was an artificial one, that the environmental and social justice
movements addressed two sides of a larger dilemma. The way we harm the earth
affects all people, and how we treat one another is reflected in how we treat
the earth …
The movement has three basic roots: environmental
activism, social justice initiatives, and indigenous culture's resistance to
globalization, all of which have become intertwined."

Our fate will depend on how we understand and treat what is left of
the planet's surpluses — its lands, oceans, species diversity and people. The
quiet hub of the new
movement — its heart and soul — is indigenous
culture."

Paul
Hawken
, "Blessed Unrest: How the
Largest Movement in the World Came into Being and Why No One Saw It Coming"

Indigenousfoods  Hawken tapped into a growing consciousness that America's Native people
not only have knowledge to share about sustainability and resilience, but about
how these interweave with social justice, the third leg of the sustainable stool
that doesn't get nearly as much attention as some of the other so-called green
topics. This post by Shawn Termin
from the National Museum of the American Indian blog
delves into this topic
a bit. Termin writes:

"For many New Yorkers, 'Green is the new black,' according to Johanna
Gorelick, Head of Education at the NMAI, Heye Center in New York City.  Green
markets have popped up in neighborhoods throughout the five NYC boroughs;
shoppers use reusable material totes instead of plastic and paper bags; and
dedicated, earth-centric citizens of the Big Apple are anxious to learn about
the many aspects of the sustainable food movement. This was evidenced by an
attendance of approximately 350 museum visitors who flocked to the recent Earth
Day program, Native Views on Sustainable Foods, at the NMAI, Heye Center in New
York on April 22, 2010. 

Three prominent speakers participated in the programming.  Winona LaDuke
(Anishinabe), Executive Director of Honor the Earth; Alex Sando (Jemez Pueblo),
representative of Native Seeds/SEARCH; and Kenneth Zontek, author of Buffalo
Nation:  American Indian Efforts to Restore the Bison."

Termin goes on to describe what the various speakers discussed, primarily the
need for developing grassroots movements in Native communities that will support
efforts to reintroduce sustainable, healthy environments through the use of a
variety of organic and sustainable food production and practices.

Full post here.

Posted by Shauna Lawyer Struby

We’re So Sorry

Posted by Sustainable OKC | Posted in Community, Weblogs | Posted on 21-01-2010

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We’ve been absent a few months. Busy schedules, holidays, life, swarmed over and derailed our merry band of Fresh Greens bloggers.

Enter 2010. We’re vowing to do better. If that sounds a little like the “r” word (a.k.a. resolution), it is.

We’re tweaking our ideas and approach for this blog so please stay tuned. New posts will be coming shortly.

In the meantime, please enjoy Fresh Greens robust archives. With more than 90 posts on a wide range of sustainable topics written in a variety of styles (funny, serious, poignant, savvy) by a community of articulate folks, we’re pretty sure you’ll find something to satisfy your taste for fresh green info.

News You Can Use

Posted by Sustainable OKC | Posted in Community, Local News, Politics, Sustainability | Posted on 11-08-2009

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Here are a few events and happenings you may want to be aware of and participate in over the coming weeks.

MAPS3 Survey for Public Transportation

The Alliance for Public Transportation seeks responses to an important survey by Friday, August 21, 2009. This survey is brief and involves answering only ten questions through the link below.

These questions request information about your interest in transit, MAPS3 and your interest in the Alliance for Public Transportation (APT). Please select the answer that best fits you! Thank you!

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=yaDjumCT10Goi9JmYD53UA_3d_3d

 

Sierra Club Cimarron Group Movie Night
Friday, August 28
7 pm social 1/2 hour

Movie at 7:30 pm with discussion following at Backwoods, 12325 North May, Suite 103, OKC

Encounters at the End of the World directed by Werner Herzog

There is a hidden society at the end of the world. One thousand men and women live together under unbelievably close quarters in Antartica, risking their lives and sanity in search of cutting-edge science.

Now, for the first time, an outsider has been admitted. In his first documentary since GRIZZLY MAN, Herzog, accompanied only by his cameraman, traveled to Antarctica, with rare access to raw beauty and raw humanity of the ultimate down under.

Encounters at the End of the World, Herzzog's latest meditation on nature, explores this land of fire, ice and corrosive solitude.

 

 

Eaton to host Prawn Field Day Demonstration

Sept. 12 at 9:30 a.m.

Register by Sept. 4

Eaton will host a field day to demonstrate how he’s been raising freshwater shrimp, or prawns, for the past two years in the pond on his farm near Cashion, northwest of Oklahoma City.

During the two-hour field day, which starts at 9:30, Eaton will harvest his second crop of prawns in as many years. In the meantime, he’ll give visitors the lowdown on production methods, potential problems, and harvesting and marketing.

Eaton received a 2008 Oklahoma Producer Grant from the Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture to demonstrate the feasibility of raising prawns in farm ponds as an additional income source for Oklahoma farmers.

Registration for the prawn field day is free, but required by September 4 to reserve a place. Space is limited. To register, email jcastillo@kerrcenter.com, or call 918.647.9123. 

Your Future, Your Ideas, Your Story

Posted by Sustainable OKC | Posted in Change, Community, Shauna Lawyer Struby, Transition Movement, Transition Town | Posted on 28-07-2009

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by Shauna Lawyer Struby

In a recent bit of news, Rob Hopkins, author of the Transition Handbook and co-founder of the Transition Network, was invited to give a TED talk. About this rather intimidating invite, Hopkins wrote:

 If you are unfamiliar with TED, they give you 18 minutes, an audience of very successful thinkers, inventors, geeks and business people, and ask you to give the talk of your life, which they film in HD and put online where it is viewed by millions of people.

Ttokclogo In his usual humble and playful way, Hopkins got to talk about the ideas making up the Transition model and process, about the inspiring way this movement is spreading around the globe, and about harnessing the creative power of people everywhere to help solve the many exceptional and urgent challenges we face.

Rob opened his talk with this declaration (to read more notes from his talk, excellent stuff, go here):

Two of the important stories we tell ourselves are either that someone else will sort it all out for us, or that we are all doomed. I’d like to share with you a very different story, and like all stories it has a beginning.

At a recent brainstorming session in Oklahoma City for Transition Town OKC, we talked a great deal about the stories of our current culture and about what an energy secure, food secure, shelter secure, abundant future without fossil fuel dependence might look like. It was an empowering, inspiring session that gave people a safe place to express vision, fears, hopes and dreams as well as a means of taking control of their lives and telling a different story.

Again and again we circled back to the current stories society tells about the meaning of success, wealth, abundance, growth and happiness. And in imagining new stories, like Rob Hopkins, we found many joyful ideas, we found hope, we found inspiration.

And now it's your turn:

  • What are the stories you hear every day about the meaning of success, wealth and happiness?
  • How do these stories affect your daily life?
  • Do you find yourself fearful, worried or hopeful, or some combination of all three and more when you think about the future?
  • Do you have an idea of what an abundant, joyful future without fossil fuel dependence might look like?
Start at the beginning and share your story, thoughts, ideas and perspectives. Looking forward to hearing from you.

Nosh, nibble and buy local goodies at the Local Food Fair today

Posted by Sustainable OKC | Posted in Community, Direct Farm Sales, Family, Farming, Food and Drink, Local News, Locavore, Oklahoma City | Posted on 14-07-2009

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Sample delicious food, shop, chat and gab at the Local Food Fair this evening. No admission!organic-food-mmwwo-001

A Local Food Fair

Tuesday, July 14

6:00 – 8:30 p.m.

Harn Homestead

1721 North Lincoln Blvd.

Oklahoma City

Local foods, plants, flowers & wine vendors and live music!

Come ready to:

  • Shop for locally-grown food & wine (please bring a reusable shopping bag).
  • Learn how easy it is to make more sustainable food choices.
  • Sample fresh locally-grown food & get to know the people who produce.

Sponsored by:

BFBLsierraclublogo

Turning sustainable ideas into reality: Jim Horne’s very determined green revolution

Posted by Sustainable OKC | Posted in Chelsey Simpson, Community, Farming, Nature, Organic Gardening | Posted on 10-07-2009

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by Chelsey Simpson

Access Tour Alumni Association 2007 Jim Horne and the Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture have long imagined agriculture with an entrepreneurial spirit and holistic ideal that transcends conventional agriculture and big industry. Their creativity and innovation introduced a quiet and growing revolution in Oklahoma, and while they’ve taken their lumps from the powers that be, they’ve doggedly continued to help family farmers keep their farms and enriched Oklahoma in ways too numerous to compile here. This past June, Fresh Greens contributor, Chelsey Simpson, interviewed Horne for an article in Oklahoma Living magazine. She graciously shares a portion of that interview here.

More than 20 years ago, Jim Horne made a decision for which he was ostracized and temporarily blacklisted by mainstream agricultural institutions across Oklahoma: he decided to put the “sustainable” in sustainable agriculture.

When Horne made the unpopular decision to change the Kerr Center’s official name to the Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture  in 1985, he took the organization, and perhaps even the state, in a new direction. From their farm and office in Poteau, the center conducts research, produces educational materials, hosts field days and offers direct support to farmers, all in the pursuit of their mission “to assist in developing sustainable food and farming systems.”

On a rainy morning in early June I sat down with Jim Horne to talk about the role he and his Kerr Center teammates have played in shaping Oklahoma’s agricultural landscape.

When did your thinking start to shift toward sustainability?

The change started in the 1980s for me because there were thousands of farmers who went bankrupt in the ‘80s, and these were not bad farmers, these were good farmers who were going bankrupt. There were cracks in the system, and I could see that we had built an agriculture system around agribusiness, and the [crop] prices would not pay for the inputs we were using. It seemed to me that there had to be a better way to farm using the tools of nature instead of just using solutions that you had to buy.

My father passed away at 42 years of age from acute poisoning from using chemicals, and that probably had a bigger impact on me than I realized. KerrDSC_0298

I understand that it created quite a bit of turmoil and that members of the board even resigned because you added the word “sustainable” to the Kerr Center’s name. 

Why was it unpopular? How could you be against it? To make something endure forever—that only makes sense. But it carried a connotation that a lot of Oklahomans felt was a threat to the funding of their institutions from agribusiness if we promoted farming that involved a lot less chemicals. We were singled out as a group of weirdos and naive tree-huggers because we started the process of asking, “How do we make sense out of farming this way?”

My approach was to ask, “How do you meet the needs of this generation without jeopardizing the ability of future generations to meet their needs? How do we keep from destroying our ecological capital?” That was a pretty foreign thought for most people.

Professionally, it was probably the hardest time in my life. I really felt ostracized for this belief, and it was a belief that I wasn’t totally sure of. I kept struggling with how to implement farming with nature. That’s when I came up with the Eight Points of Sustainability, which is all in the book [I co-wrote with Maura McDermontt.] I started breaking it down into what would make sense to a farmer.

What kind of results did you see? Did the methods you promote manage to save any farms that were in bankruptcy?

I know it managed to save a few farms, but I can’t really say how many. So many farms were so far gone by the time we started this.

We have to move to a different style and we need our universities to do research to help us move us in this direction. We have been building that concept among everyone that we don’t want to go through this [mass bankruptcy] again—we have too few farmers already. Sustainability is a necessity, not a luxury.

KerrDSC_0320 How financially viable is the kind of farming you promote?

The whole idea is to keep every drop of rain that falls on your farm, on your farm. The waste from one enterprise—pigs or cattle or chickens—is used as fertilizer in another enterprise, and you use clover to smother weeds. That’s the kind of research that we are looking at and trying to promote because it reduces what you have to buy off the farm, and farmers who are doing it, yes, they are finding profitability. Yields are probably not quite as high, but we have less invested.

How can the general public encourage sustainable agriculture?

I think consumers are the farmers’ best friends.

We have this giant agricultural industrial system that is a worldwide competition, and only large, large farmers can really compete in that system. For a small farmer to compete in a global system is a disaster. What we can do is compete in a local system, and I think that is what is overlooked.

We have lost so many rural communities, particularly in western Oklahoma. What people are realizing now—and I think it is why sustainability is becoming more popular—is that having a neighbor is valuable.

A common argument against these methods is that if everyone farmed this way we couldn’t feed the masses. I’m curious what your response is when you hear that.

The typical response is that if we farmed sustainably, half the world would starve. My answer is that right now we produce enough calories in the world that every person could have enough to eat—it is all about political strife and corruption. My take is—and I have thought a lot about this—is it our responsibility to feed the world, or is it the responsibility of each community to feed their own? I think that is really what we need to think about. KerrDSC_0355

How do we equip people, whether they are in China or Oklahoma, to create their own local food system and how do we minimize the importation of stuff?

What makes you believe so deeply in sustainability and local food? 

I think the point that it comes alive to me is realizing how interconnected we are as humans and in nature. I think that God created everything with a purpose, and when we decide that we don’t need this or that we have gone awry.

We can’t impair our systems just so
we can live affluently today. It is better to work with those systems, and that’s what sustainability is all about.

A longer version of this article is available online.

No-cost energy efficiency assistance program

Posted by Sustainable OKC | Posted in Christine Patton, Community, Energy, Local News | Posted on 07-07-2009

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by Christine Patton

Free energy efficiency upgrades for lower-income families and individuals are now available through a Weatherization Assessment Program sponsored by the Community Action Agency of Oklahoma City (CAA). This program is designed to lower your energy bills and improve your home’s energy efficiency and comfort. This is a time limited offer, so apply today!

How it Works: Call 232-0199 to apply for a free energy audit of your home. CAA will help you identify and install the most important energy efficient improvements (up to $7,000). For example, CAA will install extra insulation, new windows, new exterior doors, caulk, weather stripping, etc. They might even help you with a new refrigerator. You do not have to pay for these improvements – they are a free program sponsored by the United States stimulus package!

Who is Eligible:
1. You must reside in Oklahoma or Canadian County.
2. Your income must be less than 200% of the federal poverty level (Family of one cannot make over $21,660, Family of 2 cannot make over $29,140 and a family of four cannot make over $44,100: other income qualifiers available by calling CAA)
3. You do not have to own the home that is having the energy audit, as long as you fit the income qualifications and have the permission of your landlord.
4. Priority assistance is available for persons over 60, persons with disabilities, or households with children under 12.

This is a free program. Take advantage of this grant to help you live more economically and comfortably in your home! Call today and take advantage of this program (232-0199), or for more information about CAA check out www.caaofokc.org.